Alabama governor signs chemical castration for child sex offenders law

traveler1116/iStock(MONTGOMERY, Ala.) -- Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey on Monday signed into law a controversial bill that requires chemical castration for convicted child sex offenders before they are released from prison.

The bill, HB 379, requires convicted offenders who abused a child under the age of 13 to take drugs -- such as medroxyprogesterone acetate treatment, that block the production of testosterone as well as other naturally occurring hormones and chemicals in the body that drive libido -- as a condition for parole. Offenders will also be required to pay for the treatment unless they cannot afford it.

Alabama is not the only state to require chemical castration for sex offenders. California passed a chemical castration bill in the 1990s for repeat child sex offenders, and a similar law exists in other states including Florida, Louisiana, Montana and Oregon.

Michigan used to have a law mandating chemical castration as a parole condition, but an appeals court in 1984 ruled it unlawful.

Texas, meanwhile, has a law that stipulates an orchiectomy cannot be a condition for parole, and the inmate must request the procedure for it to be performed.

Under the Alabama law, chemical castration treatment is planned to start a month before an inmate is set to be released from prison, and will continue until the court decides it is no longer necessary, according to the bill.

Once released, if the parolee decides to stop receiving the treatment, they will be found in violation of their parole and immediately sent back to prison. Some studies have found that chemical castration of sexual offenders is effective in reducing recidivism in certain cases.

Critics of mandated chemical castration, such as the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), say it is a violation of the Eighth Amendment’s ban of "cruel and unusual punishment".

In 1997, the ACLU openly opposed the passing both California and Florida's castration laws.

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Parents brawl during youth baseball game after disagreeing with 13-year-old umpire

Parents brawl during youth baseball game after disagreeing with 13-year-old umpirefstop123/iStock(LAKEWOOD, Colo.) -- A baseball game between a group of 7-year-old kids degenerated into an all-out brawl with parents throwing haymakers, other cowering for cover and a woman even jumping on someone's back.

The reason for the brawl: a parent didn't like the calls being made by a 13-year-old umpire.

The fight began at Westgate Elementary School in Lakewood, Colo., a suburb southwest of Denver, on Saturday at about noon as 15 to 20 adults got into a violent tussle, according to Lakewood police.

The brawl was still ongoing as Lakewood police arrived at the scene.

These adults took over the field and began assaulting each other on 6/15 during a youth baseball game. We're looking for any info, in particular to ID the man in the white shirt/teal shorts. Several people have already been cited in this fight and injuries were reported. pic.twitter.com/ieenhwCrbU

— Lakewood Police (@LakewoodPDCO) June 18, 2019

Police issued four citations for disorderly conduct, but said they are still searching for others involved in the fight.

Police are looking for an adult in a white T-shirt and teal shorts in particular because he can be seen in the video throwing sucker punches at people looking in the other direction. Police said it is unknown if this person is a parent of one of the children in the game.

There were a few minor injuries and one person suffered serious bodily injury, police told ABC News. No details on the injury were available.

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