Baton Rouge Cop Killer Was Ex-Marine

iStock/Thinkstock(BATON ROUGE, La.) -- The man who authorities say gunned down three police officers Sunday in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, served five years in the U.S. Marine Corps, public records show.

The shooter, identified as 29-year-old black male Gavin Long of Kansas City, Missouri, is listed on the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) website as having joined the Marines in August 2005 and ended active duty in August 2010.

Military records released Sunday night show he made the rank of Sergeant and was a Data Network Specialist. He deployed to Iraq once, from June 2008 to January 2009, and also served at a Marine Corps base in Okinawa, Japan, the records say.

Other public records appear to show Long was married in 2009 but petitioned for divorce just two years later.

Federal authorities are currently looking at ties Long may have had to an anti-government group that Long apparently showed support for online, according to a source familiar with the probe. The group, called the Moorish Science Temple of America, was founded in the early 1900s and does not recognize U.S. government authority over the descendants of slaves, according to court documents in an unrelated lawsuit.

Long was carrying his cell phone during his assault and it has been recovered by law enforcement, the source said. The source said Long apparently rented a car in his hometown of Kansas City, Missouri, and drove the more than 700 miles to Baton Rouge.

Long killed three police officers and wounded three others before being gunned down himself, officials said. Authorities initially suspected other shooters could be on the loose, but have since determined Long appears to have been a lone gunman. Records show Sunday was Long's birthday.

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Charlottesville mayor to issue statement on Robert E. Lee statue

Charlottesville mayor to issue statement on Robert E. Lee statueMark Wilson/Getty Images(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) -- Charlottesville Mayor Mike Signer will issue a statement Friday afternoon after canceling a news conference at which he was expected to "make a major announcement" regarding the local statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee and the legacy of the woman killed during a protest sparked by the city's plans to remove the statue.

His news conference had been scheduled for noon on Friday, but the mayor tweeted Friday morning that "we are canceling today’s press conference and instead issuing a statement in the afternoon."

FYI all: we are canceling today’s press conference and instead issuing a statement in the afternoon. Stay tuned.

— Mike Signer (@MikeSigner) August 18, 2017

FYI, the reason for the change is we decided a statement rather than a press event was the best medium for the ideas I want to convey today.

— Mike Signer (@MikeSigner) August 18, 2017

The statement comes six days after a Unite the Right rally sparked by Charlottesville's plan to remove the Lee statue from a local park turned deadly.

The rally was attended by neo-Nazis, skinheads and Ku Klux Klan members. They were met with hundreds of counterprotesters, which led to street brawls and violent clashes.

A driver plowed into counterprotesters, killing Heather Heyer, 32, and injuring several others. The suspected driver is in custody, facing charges including second-degree murder.

Despite the "painful" event, "we’re not going to let them define us,” Signer told ABC News earlier this week of the agitators.

"They’re not going to tell our story," he said. "We’re going to tell our story. And outsiders -- their time has come and gone. This city is back on their feet, and we’re going to be better than ever despite this."

Signer compared his hopes for Charlottesville's recovery to the aftermath of the Charleston, South Carolina, church shooting in June 2015 that killed nine people. The gunman in that attack said he wanted to start a race war, but the tragedy instead united the city.

"There’s a memorial right now in front of Charlottesville City Hall that’s flowers and a heart that talks about the love that we have here. Those are the images that are going to replace these horrific ones from this weekend. That’s the work that we have as a country," Signer said.

"That’s what happened in Charleston. There were those horrible images of those people bloodied and killed and weeping from the church. But they were replaced quickly, steadily, by the work that started to happen. By people who said, 'You’re not going to tell our story for us. We’re going to tell our story.'

"And that’s what’s happening in this community. That’s my work as the mayor here -- is not to allow these hateful people who just don’t get this country to define us," he said. "And they’re not going to define us."

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