Bloody Weekend Leaves 4 Dead, Dozens Wounded in Chicago

iStock/Thinkstock(CHICAGO) -- It has been a violent Memorial Day weekend in Chicago, and the holiday is not even over yet.

Weekend shootings across the city have left four people dead and nearly 50 wounded, the Chicago Tribune reported.

Official numbers won’t be released until Tuesday, a Chicago Police Department spokesman told ABC News Monday.

A 15-year-old girl, identified as Veronica Lopez, was reportedly the youngest victim, shot while riding in a vehicle with a 28-year-old man around 1:30 a.m. Saturday on Lake Shore Drive, according to the Tribune.

The Cook County medical examiner's office was closed Monday.

The police department said officers, in coordination with Illinois State Police, have been out in full force all weekend long.

The planning began last week.

"Beginning now, several thousand Chicago police will be deployed in uniform ... to make sure everybody has a safe and enjoyable holiday weekend," Chicago police superintendent Eddie Johnson said in a news conference Thursday. "Our message to those who wish to victimize neighborhoods with violence is that your actions will not be tolerated..."

As officials braced for a deadly weekend and, by extension, what’s projected to be one of the deadliest years ever, the department noted in its quarterly crime report that there were 133 reported homicides from January to March this year, compared with 77 last year at the same time, and 59 in 2014.

"You have some families here raised into violence," a Chicago resident who requested anonymity told ABC News Monday, adding that the troubling crime rate is partly "the result of not so good policing as far as finding the guns and where they come from."

Tio Hardimanm, former executive director of Chicago-based anti-violence organization Ceasefire Illinois, offered another analysis.

"You have guys who are getting into it about any and everything," Hardiman told ABC News last month after a similarly deadly weekend shooting spree, "and some young guys are trying to build a body count so that they can show everybody in their neighborhood that they are the toughest guy over there."

Police superintendent Johnson was handpicked for the job last month by Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who said the 20-year Chicago police veteran was "everything the city needs."

Fifty-five people were shot, 12 fatally, in Memorial Day weekend shootings in 2015.

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Charlottesville mayor to issue statement on Robert E. Lee statue

Charlottesville mayor to issue statement on Robert E. Lee statueMark Wilson/Getty Images(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) -- Charlottesville Mayor Mike Signer will issue a statement Friday afternoon after canceling a news conference at which he was expected to "make a major announcement" regarding the local statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee and the legacy of the woman killed during a protest sparked by the city's plans to remove the statue.

His news conference had been scheduled for noon on Friday, but the mayor tweeted Friday morning that "we are canceling today’s press conference and instead issuing a statement in the afternoon."

FYI all: we are canceling today’s press conference and instead issuing a statement in the afternoon. Stay tuned.

— Mike Signer (@MikeSigner) August 18, 2017

FYI, the reason for the change is we decided a statement rather than a press event was the best medium for the ideas I want to convey today.

— Mike Signer (@MikeSigner) August 18, 2017

The statement comes six days after a Unite the Right rally sparked by Charlottesville's plan to remove the Lee statue from a local park turned deadly.

The rally was attended by neo-Nazis, skinheads and Ku Klux Klan members. They were met with hundreds of counterprotesters, which led to street brawls and violent clashes.

A driver plowed into counterprotesters, killing Heather Heyer, 32, and injuring several others. The suspected driver is in custody, facing charges including second-degree murder.

Despite the "painful" event, "we’re not going to let them define us,” Signer told ABC News earlier this week of the agitators.

"They’re not going to tell our story," he said. "We’re going to tell our story. And outsiders -- their time has come and gone. This city is back on their feet, and we’re going to be better than ever despite this."

Signer compared his hopes for Charlottesville's recovery to the aftermath of the Charleston, South Carolina, church shooting in June 2015 that killed nine people. The gunman in that attack said he wanted to start a race war, but the tragedy instead united the city.

"There’s a memorial right now in front of Charlottesville City Hall that’s flowers and a heart that talks about the love that we have here. Those are the images that are going to replace these horrific ones from this weekend. That’s the work that we have as a country," Signer said.

"That’s what happened in Charleston. There were those horrible images of those people bloodied and killed and weeping from the church. But they were replaced quickly, steadily, by the work that started to happen. By people who said, 'You’re not going to tell our story for us. We’re going to tell our story.'

"And that’s what’s happening in this community. That’s my work as the mayor here -- is not to allow these hateful people who just don’t get this country to define us," he said. "And they’re not going to define us."

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