Boston Police Tighten Security for Third Marathon Since Bombings

iStock/Thinkstock(BOSTON) -- Security is being tightened for Monday's Boston Marathon, not only because of the bombings in 2013, but also because of the recent Brussels attacks.

About 5,000 police will be available on the streets during the run and according to Boston Police Commissioner William Evans, they're not taking any chances despite there being no credible terror threat.

"It's a real crazy world out there and you know you can never be too safe," he said. "But in the near future, hopefully we slowly but surely get it back to the way it was."

Along with the heavy police presence, police plan to have security checkpoints and multiple surveillance cameras.

More than 30,000 are expected for the 120th running. Some runners are not phased by the increased security, including Heather Beute who is participating this year.

"Safety wise I'm totally calm, I'm very confident in that," she told ABC News. "I'm nervous about the race, but the weather's going to be perfect, and I'm looking forward to qualifying and coming back next year."

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Officials break ground on new park honoring the youngest victim of the Boston Marathon bombing

Officials break ground on new park honoring the youngest victim of the Boston Marathon bombingSeanPavonePhoto/iStock/Thinkstock(BOSTON) -- Officials broke ground in Boston Wednesday for a new park dedicated to Martin Richard, the youngest victim of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing.

Martin was 8 years old when he killed on April 15, 2013, as he watched the marathon from near the finish line with his family. His mother was gravely injured, and his sister, who was 7 at the time,
lost a leg.

Photos from Wednesday's ceremonial groundbreaking show children in hard hats using shovels to dig dirt. Martin's Park, located next to the Boston Children's Museum at the Smith Family Waterfront,
is expected to open in the fall of 2018, according to a press release from the office of Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker.

"This park will bring light & hope to that darkness, honoring his memory & allowing kids to be kids," Baker wrote on Twitter.

#MartinRichard lost his life to terror. This park will bring light & hope to that darkness, honoring his memory & allowing kids to be kids. pic.twitter.com/lYUTMyZNxV

— Charlie Baker (@MassGovernor) August 16, 2017

Boston Mayor Marty Walsh wrote on Twitter that the park will remind its visitors of "hope, compassion & love."

"Martin's spirit will always live on in Boston & in Martin's Park," Walsh wrote.

This park reminds us of hope, compassion & love a young boy taught us all. Martin's spirit will always live on in Boston & in Martin's Park. pic.twitter.com/w6Plokx6D7

— Mayor Marty Walsh (@marty_walsh) August 16, 2017

Both Baker and Walsh spoke at the groundbreaking ceremony, as well as Martin's family.

Martin's sister, Jane Richard, said she knows that her brother is happy that the community is coming together.

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