Dozens of Students Accused of Altering Grades at Arizona High School

Photodisc/Thinkstock(TUCSON, Ariz.) -- About 50 students at a high school in Arizona have been accused of tampering with grades in what the school district's superintendent called the largest cheating ring at the school in recent memory.

The majority of the 50 implicated students at Tucson Magnet High School are seniors and they will not be allowed to walk at graduation next week, Tucson Unified School District Superintendent H.T. Sánchez told ABC affiliate KGUN-TV on Wednesday.

"The students are facing the ultimate consequence," Sánchez said. "Their parents may have sent out graduation invitations, they're planning parties, but the students will not graduate. They have to take the class, they have to pass it the right way."

All students implicated in the "grade-changing scheme" will "have to retake a required course to earn credit for it," the school district wrote in a statement online. "For those who are seniors, graduation will be delayed until credits are completed. It will be offered as an in-person class during the summer."

The school district's investigation found "that a few students had learned the teacher's password and then began charging a fee to manipulate grades for other students," the district said in the statement. It added that its technology services department is working to require teachers to change passwords more frequently to "help prevent a reoccurrence."

Sánchez added in the statement that the acts of the few should not overshadow the achievements of the many.

"We have 3,000 students at Tucson High, and on Wednesday [May 25], hundreds will be walking across the stage to accept the diplomas they earned through hard work and perseverance," he said. "The bad decision of one group of students does not reflect on Tucson High, which is a great school, or the thousands of others who striving for academic excellence every day."

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Officials break ground on new park honoring the youngest victim of the Boston Marathon bombing

Officials break ground on new park honoring the youngest victim of the Boston Marathon bombingSeanPavonePhoto/iStock/Thinkstock(BOSTON) -- Officials broke ground in Boston Wednesday for a new park dedicated to Martin Richard, the youngest victim of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing.

Martin was 8 years old when he killed on April 15, 2013, as he watched the marathon from near the finish line with his family. His mother was gravely injured, and his sister, who was 7 at the time,
lost a leg.

Photos from Wednesday's ceremonial groundbreaking show children in hard hats using shovels to dig dirt. Martin's Park, located next to the Boston Children's Museum at the Smith Family Waterfront,
is expected to open in the fall of 2018, according to a press release from the office of Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker.

"This park will bring light & hope to that darkness, honoring his memory & allowing kids to be kids," Baker wrote on Twitter.

#MartinRichard lost his life to terror. This park will bring light & hope to that darkness, honoring his memory & allowing kids to be kids. pic.twitter.com/lYUTMyZNxV

— Charlie Baker (@MassGovernor) August 16, 2017

Boston Mayor Marty Walsh wrote on Twitter that the park will remind its visitors of "hope, compassion & love."

"Martin's spirit will always live on in Boston & in Martin's Park," Walsh wrote.

This park reminds us of hope, compassion & love a young boy taught us all. Martin's spirit will always live on in Boston & in Martin's Park. pic.twitter.com/w6Plokx6D7

— Mayor Marty Walsh (@marty_walsh) August 16, 2017

Both Baker and Walsh spoke at the groundbreaking ceremony, as well as Martin's family.

Martin's sister, Jane Richard, said she knows that her brother is happy that the community is coming together.

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