George Floyd protest updates: Famous monument of Robert E. Lee to be removed

Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty ImagesBy JON HAWORTH, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- The death of George Floyd, a black man who died on Memorial Day after he was pinned down by a white Minnesota police officer, has sparked outrage and protests in Minneapolis and across the United States.

Second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter charges have been filed against Derek Chauvin, the officer who prosecutors say held his knee on Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes. Three other officers have been charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting manslaughter.

Chauvin and the other three officers at the scene, Thomas Lane, Tou Thao and J Alexander Kueng, have been fired. The Department of Justice is investigating.

This story is being updated throughout the day Thursday. Please check back for updates. All times Eastern:

5:08 a.m.: Millions of dollars raised to help businesses and organizations affected by looting in Minneapolis

More than $4.5 million has been raised to help businesses and organizations along Lake Street rebound after being impacted by looting and vandalism.

So far, tens of thousands of people have chipped in to raise the money.

On Wednesday, the Minnesota Transitions Charter School held a donations drive for families, students and others in need.

"Look at all the people coming together and meeting those needs, today feels great it's uplifting to the soul," said Brian Erlandson, superintendent of Minnesota Transitions Charter School.

Less than a week ago, their school suffered property and water damage from the riots.

"We didn't know whether or not to cry, express our rage or what. We looked inside and it was so painful," Erlandson said.

But somehow, they're able to move forward and give back even at a time when they're down.

"Even when tragedy strikes us we're here for our kids and we always have been and we always will be," said Shawn Fondow, principal at MTS Secondary.

That is just one example of how the community is stepping up for each other. The Lake Street Council organized a fund called "We Love Lake Street." So far, over 50,000 people have donated more than $4 million.

"The $4 million is just a start, we will need a lot more to rebuild," said ZoeAna Martinez, Lake Street Council community engagement manager.

Martinez said a committee is working on how the funds will be distributed and they want to assure everyone the process will be transparent.

"Those businesses know that we're here for them, I'm here for them," Martinez said.

During times like these, generosity is contagious.

"It's just beautiful, I mean, I'm shedding a tear right now as we talk," said Frederick Joyce, who lives in Robbinsdale.

While it will take time to heal, those who work near Lake Street and call this place home aren't about to give up.

"We're going to make a comeback, we're going to do it here and it's going to be better than ever," Erlandson said.

2:53 a.m.: Three NYPD officers injured in Brooklyn with non-life threatening injuries

At 11:45 p.m. at Church and Flatbush avenues in Brooklyn, New York, two officers at an anti-looting command were approached by a man who slashed one of them on the back of the neck. Shots were subsequently fired and the officers were struck.

Hearing the gunfire, a nearby sergeant responded to the scene and shot the suspect, who is now in critical condition.

The slashed officer is currently in serious but stable condition at Kings County Hospital.

The other two officers were shot in the hand and are at the same hospital in stable condition. All three are expected to survive.

The sergeant who fired the shots was also taken to the hospital for treatment of tinnitus.

"Thank God all of our officers will recover," said New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio at a late night press conference. "It is another example of what it means everyday for the men and women of the NYPD to protect all of us, protect our communities no matter what is happening, the bravery that they show constantly ... Thank God our officers came through safely."

12:49 a.m.: Virginia governor to announce removal of Lee statue

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam is expected to announce plans later today to remove a statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee along Richmond's prominent Monument Avenue, according to reports.

The move would be an extraordinary victory for civil rights activists who have been calling for the removal of the statue of Lee, one of the country's most iconic monuments to the Confederacy, for years.

"That is a symbol for so many people, black and otherwise, of a time gone by of hate and oppression and being made to feel less than," said Del. Jay Jones, a black lawmaker from Norfolk.

Northam's decision comes amid protests across the nation and around the world over the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after a Minneapolis officer pressed his knee into Floyd's neck for several minutes, even after he stopped moving.

12:41 a.m.: Feds charge three for "Boogaloo" movement plot to incite violence at protests

Andrew Lynam is an Army Reservist and his associates, Stephen Parshall and William Loomis, served in the Navy and the Air Force, respectively.

According to the FBI, all three were preparing for a coming civil war, and self-identified as part of the so-called “Boogaloo” movement.

The men met by chance while attending ReOpen Nevada rallies in April and May, protesting against measures taken to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

But as the country was gripped over the past week by protests in dozens of U.S. cities, including Las Vegas, following the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police, the three radicals saw an opportunity to foment chaos.

Prosecutors say the men were part of an effort to “hijack” the outrage over the death of Floyd, for their own extremist agenda.

Adherents of the Boogaloo movement believe in a coming armed conflict that could lead to the fall of civilization.

According to a federal criminal complaint, Lynam and Parshall were initially planning to create a disruption at a May 19 ReOpen Nevada rally using fireworks and smoke bombs that would cause “some type of confrontation between the police and the protesters.” The FBI says the men were using tactics from the Irish Republican Army Green Book.

A heavy law enforcement presence at the rally caused the two to reconsider, but that is where they met Loomis, who shared their beliefs and wanted to join them to “take action against the U.S. government.”

What the men didn’t know was that a confidential human source working for the FBI was also in their midst.

Having passed on opportunities to disrupt ReOpen Nevada rallies, Parshall and Loomis discussed “causing an incident to incite chaos and possibly a riot,” in relation to the death of George Floyd by firebombing a power substation, according to court papers.

On May 29, the three men joined the protests in Las Vegas. Parshall was angered that the protest had not turned violent, according to the federal complaint.

The men agreed to meet the next day for a Black Lives Matter demonstration.

Before the meeting, the FBI observed Parshall buying gasoline in a gas can.

The men arrived at their appointed place and so did the confidential source who brought with him an FBI undercover agent. Just as the men were preparing their Molotov cocktails for a possible attack, the FBI SWAT Team moved in and arrested them.

The FBI seized guns, including an AR-15, ammunition, fireworks, accelerants, rags, glass bottles and four glass jars filled gasoline.

9:39 p.m.: LA announces police reforms

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and the city's police commission board announced new reforms for the Los Angeles Police Department.

The department's budget won't be raised and they will begin to find $150 million in cuts, he announced.

The decision comes amid calls from protesters to defund the police -- a popular chant outside City Hall in recent days.

The $150 million in policing cuts will come from a total shift of $250 million from the proposed budget to instead be reallocated to minority communities, he said.

"Today President [Barack] Obama challenged mayors to sign a pledge to recognize that there are things that are still not right. I was proud to be one of the first mayors in America to sign that pledge," Garcetti said at a press conference. "Tonight I want to announce that we aren’t just putting the work of moving forward on the shoulders of activists or of African Americans or police officers. It’s on those of us who you’ve elected."

"Our city identified $250 million in cuts so we can invest in jobs, in health, in education and in healing and those dollars need to be focused on our black community here in Los Angeles," he added.

The department will also be instructed to invest in more implicit bias training, youth programs and oversight programs, according to the mayor.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Check Also

Meatpacking facilities still present challenge to containing COVID-19, CDC says

ABC News(ATLANTA) -- BY: STEPHANIE EBBSAs COVID-19 cases continue to surge across the country this summer, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday meatpacking plants still present challenges in preventing transmission of the virus a...