Gun George Zimmerman Used to Kill Trayvon Martin Pulled from Auction Site

Joe Burbank-Pool/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — George Zimmerman, the man who was acquitted in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin, tried selling his gun. The gun was removed from the auction site within an hour of when the bidding went live.

The auction for the 9mm pistol that Zimmerman, 32, said he used to shoot and kill Trayvon Martin on February 26, 2012, went live today on gunbroker.com. The gun was subsequently removed from the auction site, with an error message in its place.

"The firearm for sale is the firearm that was used to defend my life and end the brutal attack from Trayvon Martin," Zimmerman wrote on the auction site, in a since removed post. "Many have expressed interest in owning and displaying the firearm, including The Smithsonian Museum in Washington D.C. This is a piece of American History.”

In an interview with FOX station WOGX-TV in Ocala, Florida, Zimmerman confirmed that he put the firearm used in the killing of Martin on the auction block.

"I'm a free American, I can do what I like with my possessions," he said, adding, "it's time to move past the firearm, and if I sell it and it sells, and I move past it."

The auction went live at 11 a.m. ET Thursday with bids starting at $5,000. Almost 50,000 visited the page, according to the site.

It has been more than four years since the fatal confrontation took place in a gated community in Sanford, Florida. Martin, 17, was returning to a relative's house after leaving a convenience store when he was shot by Zimmerman.

Prosecutors accused Zimmerman of profiling Martin as a criminal, possibly because of his race, and following him with a loaded gun. Zimmerman maintained that he shot Martin in self-defense after he was knocked to the ground and Martin was banging his head against the pavement. Zimmerman is a white and Hispanic and Martin was black.

A Florida jury found Zimmerman not guilty of second-degree murder and manslaughter in July 2013.

The trial sparked rallies across the country and created a national debate over law enforcement deaths of black men and boys.

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California anticipates much-needed rain this week after catastrophic wildfires

California anticipates much-needed rain this week after catastrophic wildfiresGoogle Earth(NEW YORK) -- Ravaged by a slew of deadly wildfires in recent days, northern California is set to get a bit of relief this week in the form of rain.

A storm system is expected to move over the Pacific Northwest later this week and the trailing cold front will most likely bring some much-needed rain to northern California between Thursday and Friday, according to ABC meteorologists.

"It will rain a bit but not enough to fully douse the blazes," AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Ken Clark said in a statement Tuesday. "The biggest advantage to firefighters will be the increase in humidity and lower temperatures."

Massive wildfires have charred more than 245,000 acres of land statewide in the past week, killing at least 41 people and destroying thousands of homes, according to authorities.

Firefighters were battling about a dozen wildfires as of late Tuesday evening, although most of them were more than halfway contained.

“The weather today will be warm with low humidity, which will continue to challenge firefighters, but only light winds are forecast,” CalFire said in a statement on Tuesday. “A chance of precipitation is expected to arrive later in the week, bringing relief from the dry conditions.”

The northern parts of the Golden State, which has bared the brunt of the fire damage, is forecast to see an influx of cloudy, cooler and wetter weather later in the week, according to AccuWeather.

Spotter from Los Osos was reporting sprinkles from this high level moisture. Dry at lower levels. Rain evaporates. Also called "Virga" #cawx pic.twitter.com/sgxj3bdXZQ

— NWS Los Angeles (@NWSLosAngeles) October 18, 2017

However, a return of dry air, heat and areas of gusty winds could once again raise the wildfire danger early next week, meteorologists said.

Separately, a band of moisture, referred to as Atmospheric River by weather experts, is currently stretching between Asia and North America. It’s expected to bring several storm systems into many parts of the Pacific Northwest through the rest of the week.

The first of these storms have already hit the Pacific Northwest with wind gusts of between 40 and 74 mph.

A number of wind warnings and flood watches are in effect in the western and northern parts of the U.S. ahead of the storm.

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