Man clinging to capsized sailboat for 12 hours rescued by boaters in Lake Erie

Savannah Macasek/iStock(MARBLEHEAD, Ohio) -- A man who clung to the hull of his sailboat for 12 hours after it capsized in Lake Erie was rescued by boaters who happened upon him the next morning.

The man was sailing home to Port Clinton on Sunday when the winds picked up around 8 p.m., knocking his boat over and sending him into the water, his wife told ABC Toledo affiliate WTVG.

The next morning, Captain Eric Langermeiser and first mate Brant Cook were taking 17 customers out on the Waterfox for sport fishing when Cook spotted a flashing light from what he first thought was a jet ski, according to the Port Clinton Fisherman's Wharf.

As they neared the vessel, they realized that it was "too odd shaped and too big" to be a jet ski, Cook told WTVG. They then saw the man straddling the hull of the boat, Langermeiser said, describing the man's eyes as "big as saucers" as they approached.

The man was suffering from mild hypothermia but was in otherwise good spirits, Langermeiser said. Customers aboard the boat donated their extra layers of clothing so the man could change out of his wet clothes.

"He was capsized, had no radio, lost his cellphone, and it happened so fast that he'd lost his life jacket," Langermeiser said.

Another vessel had passed him earlier that morning but hadn't noticed him, according to the local station.

The man was about 4 miles offshore when he boarded the Waterfox, WTVG reported. He then boarded a boat from the U.S. Coast Guard at Marblehead, Ohio, and was brought for treatment at a local hospital.

"The individual was very lucky that he was able to make it through the night," U.S. Coast Guard at Marblehead Chief Petty Officer Dave Turner told WTVG.

Coast Guard officials reminded boaters to check the weather before going out and to always wear a life jacket.

"If your boat capsizes, try to climb on top of the hull or stay with the debris; which aids us in detecting you in the water," a the Coast Guard wrote in a Facebook post.

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300 people pack courtroom to see boy adopted after 1,553 days in foster care

300 people pack courtroom to see boy adopted after 1,553 days in foster careBuckner International(ALLEN, Texas) -- An 8-year-old boy who spent 1,553 days, nearly half his life, in foster care was adopted Monday in a ceremony that featured a crowd of 300 people, a high school drill team and even Batman.

Nike Schwartz came to his adoptive family at the age of four as a foster child.

"We got a call asking to take him in and we said yes and he showed up at our door at midnight on May 4, 2016," said Nike's mom, Kristi Schwartz, now a mom of three who, with her husband David, has been a foster parent for 11 years.

"You see these kids in their most rawest form and you just feel this maternal instinct to want to provide that stability for them," she said. "For me and Nike, it was pretty quick that I knew that."

The Schwartzes, of Allen, Texas, also have a 17-year-old biological daughter and a 10-year-old daughter they adopted less than a year before welcoming Nike, who spent nine months in foster care before arriving at the Schwartzes' home.

The couple had not planned on fostering more kids until they were contacted about Nike. They were told at the time that his family placement options had been exhausted and the next home he was placed in would need to be an adoptive home, according to Schwartz.

Nike's biological parents' rights were terminated in 2017, but his adoption would take another two years to happen because of legal appeals made by his biological family.

The Schwartz family found out late last year that Nike's adoption had gone through and he would legally become a part of their family on Feb. 17.

"I saw this sense of relief that it was finally happening," Schwartz said of Nike's reaction. "We talked about it so much and the timing of it was out of our control so he couldn’t believe that it was finally happening."

To celebrate the end of four years in foster care, the Schwartzes wanted to make Nike's adoption day extra special.

They had t-shirts made that said "May the Schwartz be with you" and featured Nike's adoption date, 2-17-20.

The family also invited 300 of their family members, friends and adoption officials who have been with them throughout the journey.

Also in the audience to watch Nike get adopted were his favorite superhero, Batman, more than two dozen of his second-grade classmates and his older sister's high school drill team, who cheered Nike on with pompoms.

"It was just overwhelming. I can’t think of a better word for it," said Schwartz. "It was unbelievable to see everyone who came out and supported our family and who have supported us through all of this."

Schwartz and her husband were supported on their journey as foster and adoptive parents by Buckner International, a Christian, non-profit private adoption agency that contracts with the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services.

The agency knew that Nike is a huge Dallas Cowboys fan and surprised the family at the adoption with a gift basket from the Cowboys that included a football signed by the 2019 team.

Nike Garza has been in #fostercare for 1,553 days (half of his life), and today he was #adopted by his forever family. Thank you to the @dallascowboys for making Nike's #adoption day even more special! #HopeShinesHere pic.twitter.com/ktpjrNrnlY

— Buckner International (@buckner_intl) February 17, 2020

"That was probably the highlight of his day," Schwartz said of the surprise for Nike, who also loves playing soccer.

Andi Harrison, program director for Buckner International in North Texas, attended the adoption and said there was not a dry eye in the courtroom.

"It’s just heartwarming to see how much love people had not only for Nike but for the entire family," she told "GMA." "It brought tears to your eyes to see that it’s all finished and he can move forward and be comfortable knowing that no one is going to remove him from that home."

Harrison said the adoption was even more special because Nike, as an 8-year-old, represents a large need in the foster care system.

"There is a desperate need of homes for children who are over 8-years-old, for larger sibling groups and for children with bigger needs," said Harrison. "We are desperately looking for additional foster care parents that will not only provide short-term care but long-term care."

Across the U.S., there are more than 400,000 children in the foster care system, according to data from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). In Texas, there are more than 30,000 children in foster care, according to Harrison.

"We really just need families that stand in the gap with these children and are there for them, whether it’s 30 days or something long-term like adoption," she said. "There’s a lot of fear in the unknown but when you work with professional organizations or agencies in your local area, they know how to train you and prepare you, so don’t let fear stop you from loving on our children."

Schwartz acknowledged that her family's own transition with Nike "took a little bit" of time as he adapted to their family's stability and reached new developmental milestones. Now the family can't imagine their lives without each other.

"He has just turned into this kid who is so easygoing and such a positive little force," said Schwartz. "He has a ton of friends. Everybody loves him. He’s just a great kid."

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