Reagan Shooter John Hinckley Jr. Will Be Released to Homestay

The White House/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — John Hinckley, Jr., the man who shot President Ronald Reagan in 1981, has been granted "full-time convalescent leave" and will be released from St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Washington, D.C., where he has been in treatment.

A federal judge granted the leave, which will begin as early as Aug. 5, according to court documents. He is permitted to reside full-time in Williamsburg, Virginia, with his mother at her home.

While he lives full-time in Williamsburg, Hinckley is subject to certain conditions, and he will return for monthly outpatient therapy treatment in Washington. He will also be required to work or volunteer three times a week and participate in individual music therapy sessions at least one a month in Williamsburg.

Hinckley was ordered to stay out of contact with Jodie Foster, as it was said he shot Reagan as a way to impress the Hollywood actor. He must also stay away from the media and cannot make posts on the internet or access it. He is now allowed to contact his victims and their families, the president or vice president of the United States, and all members of Congress.

As part of the release, he is also required to abstain from alcohol and drugs. He is not allowed to own a weapon.

Whenever he is away from his mother's residence, he must carry a GPS-enabled cell phone that is monitored by the Secret Service. He is not allowed to drive unaccompanied only within a 30-mile radius of Williamsburg, unless it is for the purpose of his monthly scheduled appointments in Washington, D.C.

Hinckley is also told he must complete a daily log of his activities while on leave that detail any of his work or volunteer hours, plus social interactions and treatments, and any errands or recreational activities.

After a full year to 18 months of his leave, his doctors will complete an updated risk assessment and will then adjust his treatment plans if it is warranted, according to court documents.

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