Roaming Mountain Lion Prompts Lockdown at Los Angeles High School

iStock/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) -- A Los Angeles high school was placed on lockdown Friday afternoon after a mountain lion was seen roaming its campus.

The mountain lion wandered down from the hills near the John F. Kennedy High School campus in Granada Hills around noon, California Department Fish and Wildlife Information Officer Andrew Hughan told ABC News.

Video shows the mountain lion wandering through the high school's outdoor pathways and even sprinting across a long stretch of concrete at one point. It is then seen scaling a large wall before moving on to a residential neighborhood.

The Department of Fish and Wildlife responded to the scene, along with the Los Angeles County Fire Department and about 40 officers from the Los Angeles Police Department, who cordoned off the area and closed all streets within a block of the high school, Hughan said.

A video posted to Instagram shows the mountain lion in question munching on some grass in a resident's yard.

Wildlife officials were able to contain the animal to a few square blocks after it ran away from the school, Hughan said. A Department of Fish and Wildlife game warden then shot it with a tranquilizer gun in front of a house, he added.

After the mountain lion was subdued, the Department of Fish and Wildlife tweeted to its followers that it was "asleep and safe."

The mountain lion was then taken to a "suitable habitat" in the Santa Susana Mountains, Hughan said, but would not elaborate on the exact location for fear that citizens may go looking for it.

"Everyone worked together," Hughan said. "It was the best possible outcome for the animal."

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Officials break ground on new park honoring the youngest victim of the Boston Marathon bombing

Officials break ground on new park honoring the youngest victim of the Boston Marathon bombingSeanPavonePhoto/iStock/Thinkstock(BOSTON) -- Officials broke ground in Boston Wednesday for a new park dedicated to Martin Richard, the youngest victim of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing.

Martin was 8 years old when he killed on April 15, 2013, as he watched the marathon from near the finish line with his family. His mother was gravely injured, and his sister, who was 7 at the time,
lost a leg.

Photos from Wednesday's ceremonial groundbreaking show children in hard hats using shovels to dig dirt. Martin's Park, located next to the Boston Children's Museum at the Smith Family Waterfront,
is expected to open in the fall of 2018, according to a press release from the office of Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker.

"This park will bring light & hope to that darkness, honoring his memory & allowing kids to be kids," Baker wrote on Twitter.

#MartinRichard lost his life to terror. This park will bring light & hope to that darkness, honoring his memory & allowing kids to be kids. pic.twitter.com/lYUTMyZNxV

— Charlie Baker (@MassGovernor) August 16, 2017

Boston Mayor Marty Walsh wrote on Twitter that the park will remind its visitors of "hope, compassion & love."

"Martin's spirit will always live on in Boston & in Martin's Park," Walsh wrote.

This park reminds us of hope, compassion & love a young boy taught us all. Martin's spirit will always live on in Boston & in Martin's Park. pic.twitter.com/w6Plokx6D7

— Mayor Marty Walsh (@marty_walsh) August 16, 2017

Both Baker and Walsh spoke at the groundbreaking ceremony, as well as Martin's family.

Martin's sister, Jane Richard, said she knows that her brother is happy that the community is coming together.

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