US Will Not Seek Death Penalty Against Benghazi Suspect

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The Justice Department will not seek the death penalty against Abu Ahmed Khattalah, an alleged leader of the Benghazi attacks, federal prosecutors announced Tuesday.

“After reviewing the case information and consulting with the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the Attorney General has determined that the Justice Department will not seek the death penalty against Ahmed Abu Khatallah,” a Justice Department spokeswoman said in a statement. “The department is committed to ensuring that the defendant is held accountable for his alleged role in the terrorist attack ... and if convicted, he faces a sentence of up to life in prison."

Khattalah, a Libyan national, has been charged will several offenses that could have carried the death penalty, including murder of an internationally protected person and three counts of murder of a U.S. government employee.

Four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, were killed on Sept. 11, 2012, when terrorists attacked the U.S. diplomatic mission and a CIA facility in Benghazi, Libya.

Khatallah was allegedly a Benghazi-based leader of the terrorist group Ansar al-Sharia and is accused of helping to plan the attack. U.S. forces captured Khattalah during a secret raid in June 2014, officials said.

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Officials break ground on new park honoring the youngest victim of the Boston Marathon bombing

Officials break ground on new park honoring the youngest victim of the Boston Marathon bombingSeanPavonePhoto/iStock/Thinkstock(BOSTON) -- Officials broke ground in Boston Wednesday for a new park dedicated to Martin Richard, the youngest victim of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing.

Martin was 8 years old when he killed on April 15, 2013, as he watched the marathon from near the finish line with his family. His mother was gravely injured, and his sister, who was 7 at the time,
lost a leg.

Photos from Wednesday's ceremonial groundbreaking show children in hard hats using shovels to dig dirt. Martin's Park, located next to the Boston Children's Museum at the Smith Family Waterfront,
is expected to open in the fall of 2018, according to a press release from the office of Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker.

"This park will bring light & hope to that darkness, honoring his memory & allowing kids to be kids," Baker wrote on Twitter.

#MartinRichard lost his life to terror. This park will bring light & hope to that darkness, honoring his memory & allowing kids to be kids. pic.twitter.com/lYUTMyZNxV

— Charlie Baker (@MassGovernor) August 16, 2017

Boston Mayor Marty Walsh wrote on Twitter that the park will remind its visitors of "hope, compassion & love."

"Martin's spirit will always live on in Boston & in Martin's Park," Walsh wrote.

This park reminds us of hope, compassion & love a young boy taught us all. Martin's spirit will always live on in Boston & in Martin's Park. pic.twitter.com/w6Plokx6D7

— Mayor Marty Walsh (@marty_walsh) August 16, 2017

Both Baker and Walsh spoke at the groundbreaking ceremony, as well as Martin's family.

Martin's sister, Jane Richard, said she knows that her brother is happy that the community is coming together.

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