Violent Protests Erupt in Charlotte After Deadly Police Shooting

iStock/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) — At least two demonstrators and several police officers have been injured after protests erupted following a deadly police shooting in Charlotte, North Carolina, on Tuesday.

Officers in riot gear deployed tear gas into a crowd of protesters after individuals targeted police cruisers, ABC affiliate WSOC-TV Charlotte reported.

 

 

Early Tuesday morning the unrest raged on as a group of people blocked traffic on I-85. A live video feed from a WSOC-TV helicopter hovering above the scene appeared to show people removing items from the back of trucks on the highway.

The scene on I-85 appeared to devolve into looting, with people pulling items from tractor-trailers and burning boxes.

A group of people attempted to break in to a Walmart, WSOC-TV reported, and scattered when police arrived at the scene.

 

 

The shooting took place Tuesday afternoon after officers arrived at an apartment complex in the city of Charlotte at about 4 p.m., searching for a suspect who had an outstanding warrant, a police statement said.

Police said the man fatally shot, identified as Keith Lamont Scott, was not the suspect officers were searching for, but had exited from a vehicle with a firearm and the officers believed he posed an imminent deadly threat.

Scott's family quickly challenged the police account of the fatal shooting, saying he was not armed and that he was holding a book and waiting for his son to be dropped off from school, WSOC-TV reports.

Detectives say they recovered the firearm they believe Scott had been holding at the time of the shooting at the scene, WSOC-TV reports.

Charlotte's mayor, Jennifer Roberts, tweeted that "the community deserves answers and full investigation will ensue," and asked for calm as investigators worked the case.

 

 

Police identified the officer involved in the shooting Brentley Vinson, who has been employed with the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department since July 21, 2014 and is currently assigned to the Metro Division. Per standard procedure with any officer-involved shooting, Vinson has been placed on paid administrative leave, police said.

As night fell in Charlotte, protesters blocked off a busy road and chanted "Hands up, don't shoot!"

Both the officer involved in the deadly shooting and the victim are African-American, a police source told WSOC-TV.


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California anticipates much-needed rain this week after catastrophic wildfires

California anticipates much-needed rain this week after catastrophic wildfiresGoogle Earth(NEW YORK) -- Ravaged by a slew of deadly wildfires in recent days, northern California is set to get a bit of relief this week in the form of rain.

A storm system is expected to move over the Pacific Northwest later this week and the trailing cold front will most likely bring some much-needed rain to northern California between Thursday and Friday, according to ABC meteorologists.

"It will rain a bit but not enough to fully douse the blazes," AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Ken Clark said in a statement Tuesday. "The biggest advantage to firefighters will be the increase in humidity and lower temperatures."

Massive wildfires have charred more than 245,000 acres of land statewide in the past week, killing at least 41 people and destroying thousands of homes, according to authorities.

Firefighters were battling about a dozen wildfires as of late Tuesday evening, although most of them were more than halfway contained.

“The weather today will be warm with low humidity, which will continue to challenge firefighters, but only light winds are forecast,” CalFire said in a statement on Tuesday. “A chance of precipitation is expected to arrive later in the week, bringing relief from the dry conditions.”

The northern parts of the Golden State, which has bared the brunt of the fire damage, is forecast to see an influx of cloudy, cooler and wetter weather later in the week, according to AccuWeather.

Spotter from Los Osos was reporting sprinkles from this high level moisture. Dry at lower levels. Rain evaporates. Also called "Virga" #cawx pic.twitter.com/sgxj3bdXZQ

— NWS Los Angeles (@NWSLosAngeles) October 18, 2017

However, a return of dry air, heat and areas of gusty winds could once again raise the wildfire danger early next week, meteorologists said.

Separately, a band of moisture, referred to as Atmospheric River by weather experts, is currently stretching between Asia and North America. It’s expected to bring several storm systems into many parts of the Pacific Northwest through the rest of the week.

The first of these storms have already hit the Pacific Northwest with wind gusts of between 40 and 74 mph.

A number of wind warnings and flood watches are in effect in the western and northern parts of the U.S. ahead of the storm.

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